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Otros Temas de Salud
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Stress
Why do I need to take
medications
Diabetes


Hypertension or high blood pressure, is one of the most common diseases
affecting our society. According to the CDC, almost 1/3 of the population has
elevated blood pressure. Despite how common this disease may be, many
people are not aware they have hypertension. Others are aware of their
diagnosis, but don’t feel any symptoms and do not understand why they need
to take medications. I hope this article can will help you understand the
importance of treating this common disease and the potential consequences
if left untreated.
With hypertension, the arteries in your body experience higher than normal
pressure. It is normal for pressures to go up transiently throughout the day
depending on your activity level. However, if this goes on for too long, it can be
damaging. The elevated pressures damage the arteries supplying blood to
the organs in your body, leading to a variety of consequences. The arteries
supplying blood to your heart can clot, leading to a heart attack. This can also
happen to the arteries in your brain, leading strokes and bleeding of the
brain. The kidneys are commonly affected by elevated blood pressure. If left
untreated, this could potentially lead to dialysis.
There are many causes of hypertension. Poor diet, high body weight and
stress are causes. Sleep apnea is becoming a more common cause for high
blood pressure (to be discussed in a future article). Other causes include
kidney disease, alcohol, smoking, certain medications, illegal drug use, and
much more.
So what are the symptoms of high blood pressure? Unfortunately, this is
controversial. A common misconception is that headaches are associated
with high blood pressures. There is one study suggesting an association
between headaches and extremely high blood pressures1. Additionally,
these people tend to also notice vision changes, change in their mental
status or decrease in urine output. These people should seek medical care
immediately. But for the vast majority of the population, there are no obvious
symptoms of hypertension.
So what is the treatment for high blood pressure?
Lifestyle changes are a great start. This includes things such as eating
healthier, being more active, quitting smoking and decreasing stress (as
discussed in previous article). If all of these changes do not decrease your
blood pressure, your doctor may start you on a medication. There are many
medications to treat hypertension. As such, it is important to tell your doctor
any side effects you may have from your medication as there is likely an
alternative that will be better tolerated. As long as you are not suffering from
side effects, it is important that you take your medications as hypertension is
a silent disease and you may feel okay despite your body seeing high blood
pressures.  
Hypertension, or high blood pressure, is a common disease with grave
consequences if not treated properly. These include heart attack, kidney
disease and stroke. People often do not feel symptoms. If you are started on
medication, it is important to keep on taking the medication even if you feel
well.
For our next topic, we will discuss low blood pressure, or hypotension.
References
1.The American journal of emergency medicine, ISSN: 1532-8171, Vol: 32,
Issue: 9, Page: 976-81  Publication Year:  2014   
Disclaimer: The content in this article is not intended to be a substitute for
professional medical advice, diagnosis, or treatment.  Always seek the advice
of your physician or other qualified health care provider with any questions
you may have regarding a medical condition.  Never disregard professional
medical advice or delay seeking medical attention because of something you
have read on this publication.   Reliance on information in this article is at
your own risk.  Do not hesitate to call 911 in the event of a health or
psychiatric emergency.

Disclaimer:  The content on this blog is not intended to be a substitute for
professional medical advice, diagnosis, or treatment.  Always seek the
advice of your physician or other qualified health provider with any
questions you may have regarding a medical condition. Never disregard
professional medical advice or delay in seeking it because of something
you have read on this website. Reliance of information on this blog is at
your own risk. Do not hesitate to call 911 in the event of a
health/psychiatric emergency.

If you have a question send it to: email: bilingualpress@latinewszone.com   
Mail: Dr. Gaines, P.O. Box 48183 Spokane, WA 99228